Q&A

Music (9)

All types of music are Haraam in Islam.

Category: Music

It is Haraam to allow children to listen to music in school. To use rhymes in school learning is allowed but WITHOUT music.

Category: Music

If the music during war times is produced using the musical instruments, then it is not allowed. The music of the National Anthem is also Haraam.

Category: Music

Qawwali music is also not allowed.

Category: Music

Listening to music is Haraam, whether you are alone, or with your husband.

Category: Music

Classical music is also Haraam.

Category: Music

If the lyrics sang are commonly known as songs, for example they are sang by singing stars, then it is Haraam to do so. However traditionally there are poems, lyrics or NASHEED, as referred to in Arabic, which are not commonly regarded as songs, and have normally been recited on wedding occasions are allowed to be recited in weddings.

Category: Music

It is Haraam for you to go and sit with your niece in the wedding ceremony knowing that music will be played. In fact, it may even be your religious duty before Allah to practice “Nah-y ‘An-el-Munkar” – which means to forbid evil – by reminding the future in-laws of your niece of the Haraam nature of music, and they should therefore refrain from allowing music to be played during the wedding ceremony. If they persist on doing so, you could arrange with them that music be stopped for a period of time – say half an hour – so that you, and others like you, could participate in the wedding ceremony for that period and then leave.

Category: Music

According to the clear hadith from the infallible Imams (AS), Music is Haraam. On this basis, the Fatwa (decree) of Ayatollah Imam Muhammad Shirazi is that Music is Haraam. This includes listening to music, playing musical instruments, and buying or selling such instruments. Any kind of music, which would be in the category of being “moving” music, is Haraam. Furthermore, the music that could be categorised as “not moving”, but played by the same or similar instruments, is also Haraam. In short, music is Haraam whether or not it could be categorised as “moving”. Along the same line, the “music of the human voice”, i.e. singing, even without the playing of musical instruments, is also Haraam. This is so, to the extent that even if the Qur’an is recited in a “singing” manner, this action is regarded as Haraam. Needles to say, in Islam one is encouraged, according to many hadith, to recite the Qur’an in the “best manner” to the extent that the listener would be touched by it, and that listening to this recitation would create humility in one’s heart before Allah (SWT). But this is different from when one is “singing” the Qur’an. It may be asked, “How do we differentiate between the singing of the Qur’an and the recitation or TILAWAH of the Qur’an?” The answer is this is determined by the ‘URF which is the “common definition amongst the public” or the “general consensus”. If the recitation of the Qur’an is seen as “recitation” and “TILAWAH” then it is Halaal, and if it is seen and regarded as “singing”, then that singing of the Qur’an is Haraam. Some may call the sound of sea waves, waterfall, willowing wind, etc. to be music. If this is the case then this kind of “music” is Halaal! Provided that it is not accompanied by the conventional singing or the playing of conventional musical instrument(s).

Category: Music

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